Kicking Technique & 36 Sec.Video

The video shown above is 36 seconds in length. Download time will vary
with your computers capabilities. Special thanks to Andries Koers, who is
demonstrating on the video and to Kickbike UK for allowing us the use of
their video.

PLEASE NOTE: You will see two foot changing techniques shown on the video:
1) The "Heel- Roll" technique is shown during the first 16 secs.
2) The " Hop-step" technique is shown during the last 20 secs.

THE ABC'S OF KICKING

Although it is easy to ride a Kickbike, it is worthwhile keeping certain
basic guidelines in mind when taking your first kicks. Correct technique
saves energy and enables you to achieve your best possible speed.

Take long kicks, let it roll. On flat terrain long kicks are more efficient
than short fast ones. Concentrate on free and easy kicks and keep your
weight on the standing foot. Don't lean on your kicking leg or your hands.
Keep your standing leg straight between kicks.

Relax. Enjoy Kickbiking. Don't try to force yourself into a certain style or
speed. You can balance like on an ordinary bike. The feeling is only a
little different, because you don't have a saddle/seat.

Changing Legs

In order to prevent kicking from becoming monotonous and your muscles from
getting fatigued early, learn to change the kicking leg frequently. Changing
leg is the only new thing to learn if you already know how to ride an
ordinary bike.

Start with standing with your right foot on the footboard.
Turn your right foot aside keeping your weight on the heel.
Step with the toes of your left foot to the released space.
Raise your right foot from the footboard.
Turn your whole left foot onto the footboard.
When you are ready to change again, do the same steps the other way around.

Practice changing your leg so that you don't have to look at your feet all
the time in the traffic.

A suitable change frequency is about 5 kicks per foot. A simple guideline
is:

Hard effort -> more frequent change
Less effort -> less frequent change

Uphill

In spite of some false preconceptions, you can ride your Kickbike nicely
also uphill. You need to master the technique though, in order to take
advantage of the light 9 kg weight compared to an ordinary bike.

When the road starts to ascend, the Kickbike tends to slow down noticeably
between the kicks. However, don't slow down consciously. Instead, alter your
technique.

Increase frequency. Take shorter kicks. Change your pendulum-like kick to a
rotating one. When you keep your kicking knee slightly bent you can bring
the leg quickly back to the front for a new kick. In the kicking phase,
however, try keep your legs straight avoiding excess vertical movement.

If you wish to increase your frequency further, you need to learn the "hop-
step"leg changing technique. Jump immediately after you have kicked and are
bringing your kicking foot to the front. A low, almost inconspicuous jump
does not waste too much energy.

If the hill is too steep for your fitness or skill, don't be discouraged. It
is extremely easy to move into running or walking. For a beginner this is
often the most convenient alternative.

Downhill

When the velocity downhill increases enough, you will soon notice that it's
better to stop kicking. It is easiest to stand on the footboard with both
feet pointing slightly aside to the same direction.

At the end of the descent let your Kickbike roll while the velocity
decreases to your normal kicking speed. A beginner often starts kicking while
the speed is still too high and touching the ground only slows the journey.

Always reserve enough room for braking by adjusting your velocity according
to visibility. It takes more time to stop in downhill than on flat land.

Kickbike in Traffic

Check your local traffic regulations for any rules about scootering. They
vary between different countries and states. Even within one country a law
enforcement officer's interpretation of a Kickbiker's status in traffic
might base on first impression rather than legislation. If in doubt, you'd
better common sense and use the safest alternative. Although a pedestrian by
definition, a Kickbike can be taken on the road or bicycle lanes with a
helmet.

Stopping and Starting

Stopping and starting is easy with your Kickbike. You can transfer from
kicking to walking or vice versa with one step. The fastest way to kick off
is to take a couple of running steps and then jump onto the footboard.

Walking your Kickbike

A short and narrow rear makes the Kickbike much easier to walk than a bike.
When walking your Kickbike you can hold it on the stem. This leaves your
other hand free.

Carrying your Kickbike

You can jump over the edge of a sidewalk, but it is easier to take a few
steps carrying your Kickbike and then jump again onto the footboard.

It is convenient to carry your Kickbike in stairs to a suitable safe storage
location. Carry your Kickbike holding it on the frame. It is a natural
handle.

If you use public transportation with your Kickbike, you might like to own a
Kickbike Bag, so that the tyres don't scratch or smear your fellow
passengers. Furthermore, with your Kickbike neatly packed there will be no
dispute with the conductor whether the Kickbike is a bicycle requiring an
additional fee or not.

Parking

You can use the Kickstand to park you Kickbike. Alternatively you can lean
it against a wall or lay it on the ground. It has no easily damaged parts,
such as the pedals and gears on an ordinary bicycle.

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